Gina Vivinetto’s Greatest Hits

Archive for the tag “The Doors”

Cassette tape rock star art

In the most creative recycling I’ve seen in a long time, some talented artist on Flickr makes these amazing portraits of rock stars using only cassette tape. (Kids, if you don’t know what cassette tape is, it’s the thin, seamless black ribbon found inside of musical cassettes old folks like me used to buy).

Look at these portraits, they’re amazing:

Bob Dylan:

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Jimi Hendrix:

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Jim Morrison:

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Go to the Flickr site and see the rest. Bravo!

The most important birthday in the world — for music lovers

As anyone knows me knows: this is the most important day in rock ‘n’ roll. I’m going to take this opportunity to reprint an article I wrote for the St. Petersburg Times in 2004 when I was the paper’s pop music critic. Again it’s five years old, so don’t be fooled by the ages listed:

Raise a toast this day, rock ‘n’ rollers. It’s a special one for music lovers.

Jan. 8 marks the birthday of Elvis Presley, the King of Rock ‘N’ Roll (today Elvis would have celebrated number 69), and the birthday of several more notables in rock history.

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David Bowie turns 57.

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The Doors’ Robby Krieger is 58.

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Little Anthony Gourdine of Little Anthony and the Imperials: 64.

R. Kelly celebrates number 35.

Terry Sylvester of the Hollies is 57.

Shirley Bassey turns 67.

Even the late concert promoter and Grateful Dead buddy Bill Graham, who devoted his life’s work to rock music, was born on this day in 1931.

Can you imagine what rock would be like if Jan. 8 were wiped off the calendar?

Think of the rock history we would have been denied: No “Hound Dog”, as done by Elvis, with leg wiggle. No Bowie dressed as Ziggy Stardust. No “Light My Fire.” (Krieger wrote the tune.) All those legendary Dead concerts at the Fillmore in San Fran – poof! Gone.

You wouldn’t be reading this article. My birthday, too, is Jan. 8, as I’ve been proud to say my whole life.

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As has Jeremy Gloff.

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The Tampa singer-songwriter turns 29 today. Gloff says he found out back in middle school that he’d been born on a special day. Already a music obsessive, “I bragged to everyone about it,” Gloff says. “If the day Buddy Holly died was the day music died, than Jan. 8 has got to be the day the music was born.”

With 12 albums under his belt, tireless Gloff shares a work ethic equal to that of Presley and Bowie.

Could it be a Capricorn thing?

Astrologists say Capricorns, folks born between Dec. 22 and Jan. 19, are a hard-working bunch. Like the goats who represent us on the zodiac, we see a mountain, and by golly, we climb it.

Unfortunately, Capricorns are also supposed to be uptight, prone to mood swings and gloominess, and fastidious to the point where it’s an unpretty line between our orderliness and others’ obsessive-compulsive disorder.

“My CD collection is totally alphabetized,” Gloff admits. “It’s sorted by release dates, all the albums in a row by the date they came out. Even CD singles are organized in between by the date. I’m totally Type A.”

When I spoke with Krieger last year while he toured with the Doors 21st Century, we discussed magic Jan. 8. We jawed about astrology – turns out, Krieger is into the stuff and, like Elvis and Bowie, always searching spiritually.

Krieger said that, like most Capricorns, he’s finding himself less gloomy and more playful as he gets older.

We giggled about how Krieger, in his 20s during the 1960s, believed all of the bad things going on in the world and in his life were part of a great conspiracy.

Paranoid? A Capricorn? Well, the astrology books say we’re “cautious.”

Cautious like Elvis, with his “Memphis Mafia” and rampant conspiracy fears? Walled up in Graceland, shooting TV sets, windows and anything else that reminded him of a reality he couldn’t deal with. Ultimately dying “down at the end of Lonely Street” in his bathroom, fat, bingeing, addicted to the drugs that were meant to combat the mood swings and gloominess and paranoia.

Or David Bowie, holed up, high on cocaine in Berlin during his 1970s recording blitz? Dressing in vintage war clothes as the Thin White Duke, his alter ego too “cautious” to blink in public.

Gloff’s no paranoid freak, but he does see similarities between Bowie and himself:

Like Bowie did during the 1970s, Gloff wears his sexuality on his sleeve or, in the case of Gloff’s pic on Romantico, his latest disc, across his chest. Gloff’s vintage iron-on T-shirt reads: Made for Loving Him. He also changes his look a lot. Right now, Gloff’s head is shaved, but his hair has been an assortment of colors, and he’s been known to wear electrical tape as part of his onstage wardrobe.

Also, as Bowie did several times during the 1970s and the 1980s, Gloff toys with a musical alter ego. When Gloff records his peppy, naughty electronica dance music, it’s under his J.Glo alias.

Gloff gives props to the King, too, but he’s says he’s not much of an Elvis freak. The King’s former queen, however, is another story.

“I’m a huge fan of Priscilla Presley,” Gloff says, “She always had good hairdos, even on Dallas.

Anyway, Happy Birthday, everyone. It’s a rock ‘n’ roll party. Get yourself a slice of cake, that is, if The King left any for the rest of us.

Something weird about the Germs

Don’t you think this is kind of bizarre? Three-fourths of the original Germs, the Los Angeles punk band that broke up in 1980 when lead singer Darby Crash committed suicide – are playing gigs in L.A. with Shane West as their vocalist.

Yes, Shane West, the former ER actor who portrays Crash in the new biopic about the band What We Do Is Secret. I understand it’s a publicity stunt to market the film, but gee whiz.

A writer for the L.A.-based web site Defamer reports:

“(T)hey didn’t suck. In fact, they are probably better now than during their heyday in the sense that they can actually play their instruments and they are able to finish an hour-and-a-half set without destroying the entire venue, falling down from abusing too many substances or bleeding profusely on stage.”

When then you, sir, were not at a Germs show!

What’s next? Joy Division plays gigs with the fake Ian Curtis from Closer? Val Kilmer tours with the remaining Doors? Sissy Spacek pushes Loretta Lynn off the stage to sing her songs at the state fair?

It’s just weird.

Here’s the real Darby Crash, courtesy of Jenny Lens’ invaluable Punk Archive.

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