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Iggy Pop’s car insurance company: no musicians

Remember when we bitched about Iggy Pop‘s British car insurance commercial for Swiftcover?

iggy_pop_golfing1

It gets better.

Now The Guardian is reporting that IRL Swiftcover doesn’t insure musicians. Naturally, when some musicians were recently denied coverage by Swiftcover, they were flummoxed by the hypocrisy of the company’s having the 61-year-old Godather of Punk as its spokesperson. Some were so incensed, they enlisted the help of the Advertising Standards Authority whose spokesperson issued this statement:

“We have received 12 complaints and we are formally investigating those complaints. They have challenged whether it is misleading to suggest Iggy Pop has insurance with swiftcover because its website states that those who work in entertainment cannot take out a car insurance policy with that insurer.”

Why do they have Iggy Pop as their spokesperson if they don’t cover musicians?

The company’s response?

Tina Shortle, marketing director of swiftcover.com, said Iggy Pop had been chosen as the face of its advertising “because he loves life, not because he is a musician. He is an actor demonstrating the benefits of swiftcover.com.”

Iggy’s shirtless in the commercial. In full-on Iggy stage mode. Isn’t there some old Stooges road story about Iggy crashing their tour bus into an overpass?

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One thought on “Iggy Pop’s car insurance company: no musicians

  1. Neil Wilson on said:

    Perhaps Tina Shortle hasn’t had the pleasure of perusing Swiftcovers rather large Exception List.

    An actor for example, would be excluded under the term ‘Entertainer’ and under their Exception number 26 it clearly states:

    “We will not pay any liability, loss, damage, cost or expense caused if the policyholder or driver is not normally resident in England, Scotland or Wales for nine months of the year.”

    How many months of the year does Iggy spend in the U.K.?

    Just a simple and straightforward case of misleading and false advertising, one which should prove to be quite an easy adjudication for the A.S.A. who are currently investigating this debacle.

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